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Tūwhitia te hopo, mairangatia te angitū

Tanya Tucker
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It’s a familiar feeling for many on their te reo Māori journey and one Tanya Tucker knows well. 

“For ages I’d say as little as possible in class and felt really out of my depth,” she says.

“Everyone was really supportive but I worried I wouldn’t know what people were talking about and I felt whakamā because you don’t want to stuff it up.”

The easy option would be to chuck it in – particularly since COVID-19 forced classes online – but Tanya says while learning te reo Māori can be challenging, it’s also hugely satisfying.

“When I started, I had very limited basics that I learned at school in the ‘90s. I came in thinking I was just learning a language, but there is so much tikanga and waiata and karakia. A whole lot of things I was unaware of, and I loved it. It’s totally changed my outlook.”

She is currently studying the Diploma in Te Aupikitanga ki te Reo Kairangi at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa in Kaikohe, after initially studying Te Pūtaketanga o te Reo in 2018 and Te Rōnakitanga ki te Reo Kairangi last year.

Tanya – Ngāti Kahu ki Whangaroa – says the more she learns, the more she appreciates the beauty of te reo Māori.

Read the full story on the Te Wānanga o Aotearoa website

Nikau (second from left in front row) with his cohort at Puketeraki marae. Nikau’s flatmate Nic Sinnott (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Tūwharetoa) is in the centre holding a taiaha. Nic introduced Nikau to Te Wānanga o Aotearoa.

Kia tika te reo – Doing it Right and Continuously Improving

Te Pīnakitanga o te reo Kairangi graduate Nikau Reti-Beazley (Ngāpuhi), enrolled in the Level 7 Diploma in Ōtepoti to improve his grasp on te reo and what he discovered was not only a new extended whānau to practise kōrero, but also an opportunity to visit some of the stunning marae in the wider Otago area.

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Māori